Massena Museum in Nice, France

 

Massena MuseumMassena Museum, Nice, France

http://www.nice.fr/fr/culture/musees-et-galeries/musee-massena-le-musee 

Housed in a stately, 19th century villa on the promenade des Anglais overlooking the Mediterranean, the Massena Museum —the façades and roofs of which are classified by French Historic Monument Association—offers visitors a viewing of Empire Age salons and furnishings, tranquil English-style Gardens, and temporary exhibits, such as its current photography exhibit, Jean Gilletta et la Cote d’Azur, paysages et reportages, 1870-1930.

 

As the primary and inexhaustible landscape photographer of the Riveria, Gilletta documented its art and culture, commercialism, and tourism. According to Gilletta’s great nephew, “…nothing escaped his lens,” as he captured a time in flux, casting that lens on the modest and humble as well as the privileged. On construction sites, railways, and bridges. On market vendors, washerwomen, presidents and princes. He recorded rural life and the high life of Nice and Monaco among other sites. From fashionable spa towns, olive groves, and snow-covered mountain peaks to the 1887 earthquake, he was an exemplary reporter and witness for his times.

A 19th century Cartier-Bresson, Gillette preserved those times–forever gone or transformed–through at least 10,000 photos as he tooled around the Cote d’Azur on his three-wheeled, motorized bike—an example of which is on exhibit. In addition to snapping photos, he was also a prolific publisher of postcards and books.

Massena Museum Cut out photo 2The delightful exhibit opens with head cutouts of peasants of the day. Go ahead, stick your head though the opening slot and journey back in time. (I did; Noel was less enthusiastic.) The guards will take your photos. The balance of the exhibit holds numerous original photo prints of people at play and work along the seaside and in the country. The photographs are small and require time and close-up inspection, but to get a sense of the larger exhibit, the designers have created life-size impressions projected on the walls in each room recreating the ambience in which Gilletta worked. In addition to the photos, there’s a three-wheeled, motorized bike that Gilletta tooled around the Cote d’Azur setting his sights on images to snap. A large box camera he used is also on view.

The show recalls an insouciant time along the Cote d’Azur through five principle themes: Nice the resort capital of France, Nissa la Bella (Nice the Beautiful–the city’s unofficial anthem. Listen on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=15oZvZtsYYw), By the Mountains and the Valleys, Under the Azure along the Coast, and The News in Pictures.

The exhibit closes March 5, 2018.

The Museum’s permanent collection displays the history of Nice from the 19th century up to the end of 1930s. Highlights include Napoléon’s death mask and Josephine’s tiara with its glittery gemstones, gold, and pearls.

Massena Museum view from window

Practical Info

http://www.nice.fr/fr/culture/musees-et-galeries/musee-massena-le-musee

Hours: Tuesday-Sunday 11-6, winter; 10-6, summer.

Closed Tuesdays and certain holidays

Tickets: 6 Euros or buy a 7-day pass for 20 Euros (Access to all 12 municipal museums and galleries for 7 days in Nice)

Location: 65, rue de France (ticket entrance)

Petersen Auto Museum

Petersen Museum for Car Buffs and Others

Even if you’re not an auto aficionado (I’m not), one can surely find an element of oohs and ahs when visiting The Peterson Auto Museum in LA. Hard to miss the building itself: Like a crazy layer cake interspersed with red and metallic icing, the façade is wrapped in a spiraling whirl of metalwork resembling a car grill. Inside, even the stairwell appears as a vortex of chrome.

1981 Delorean Time Machine, Back to the Future

I was fascinated with the history of former celebrity-owned cars (Steve McQueen’s is there), futurist visions of transport with aircraft-inspired styling, and film vehicles such as the Winged Warrior 1989 Batmobile, Herbie the Love Bug, and the Delorean DMC12 Time Machine driven in “Back to the Future.”

Holy SideCar, Batman! Yes, TV’s 1966 Yamaha YDS-3 BatCycle is here, too. But, most of all, I loved the shiny chrome colors rarely available on current cars: metal lime green, eggplant purple, and orange ice to name a few. Polished to a high sheen, cars new and old glittered and gleamed. Three floors full.

On view are antique machines that weren’t much more than an engine on a plank of wood and four wheels, grand luxury sedans of 20s 30s, and the wonderful excesses of the 50s with magnificent color and elongated tail fins. See tiny cars without any soul built in Japan and copied by Americans.

The history of the auto is unveiled bearing witness to a technologically changed world at a price almost anyone can afford, thanks to Henry Ford’s everyman car. Most clearly present at the museum is America’s love affair with being on the road in a car of choice.

Stairwell

Interior

Goodbye Iceland

Goodbye Iceland

Goodbye to fiery sunsets. Goodbye to grazing sheep, gorgeous horses, and glacial waterfalls. Goodbye to volcanic ash and rocky terrain. Goodbye to black-pebbled sandy beach, geothermal energy, and blue ice. Goodbye to hiking and biking and trekking unstable ground. Goodbye to delicious seafood and icy drink-from-the tap glacial water. Goodbye to deep crevices, gleaming glaciers, and Mother Nature’s barren beauty. Read more ›

Views from Vigeland Park

Views from Vigeland Park in Oslo (http://www.vigeland.museum.no/en/vigeland-park),
which as my bike tour leader Paul noted, has the most naked statues anywhere in
the world. Read more ›

Perfect Days in Sydney

Far from the madness in France…perfect days in Sydney: A high school band entertains us with a Big Band Jazz
performance outdoors at Martin Place. We accidentally discover a fun Rock & Roll exhibit “What
a Life Rock Photography by Tony Mott”
at State Library of New South Wales with it’s grand Ionic columns, then meander through the Royal Botanical Gardens.

We cap the day with a rousing evening concert of Mussorgsky orchestrated by Ravel, Pictures at an Exhibition, conducted by Miguel Harth-Bedoya at Sydney Opera House, still aglow in French red white and blue.

Image below from What a Life!

Sing-A-Long in NYC

Sing-a-long in NYC

Dark and dim but not dismal, this historic piano bar draws gays and local musical theater talent belting out Broadway tunes with gusto. Doesn’t matter whether you can carry a tune. Sing-along or not.  Dress down and expect to stand unless you get lucky with one of the few bistro tables.

The most elaborate thing a midst the gaiety is the mirrored bar depicting the American Revolution or perhaps the French. This is an old-time West Village joint said to have been the location of a brothel in the 1800s. Named originally for Marie DuMont, the bar added Crisis as a nod to Thomas Paine who supposedly died in this location and authored “The Crisis Papers,” a series of essays in support of our Independence from  Britain. “THESE are the times that try men’s souls…” He could well have written it today. According to http://www.ushistory.org/paine/crisis/, “General Washington found the first essay so inspiring, he ordered that it be read to the troops at Valley Forge.”

These days, the piano bar singing inspires more revelry then revolution, nonetheless…

Open until the wee hours:

Mon.–Sat., 5:30 p.m.–4 a.m., Sun., 6 p.m.–3 a.m.

59 Grove St. (near 7th Ave.)

(212) 243-9323

Morgans Hotel NYC

Trees grow in NYC– I was surprised to see this little green city oasis from my room at
Morgans Hotel.

After being at a noisy writers conference over the
past weekend at the extremely loud Roosevelt Hotel on Madison Avenue, it was a
pleasure to come back to the calming atmosphere of Morgans Hotel (https://www.morganshotelgroup.com/originals/originals-morgans-new-york)
just eight blocks away on Madison. I’m a bit leery about giving away my secret
because I love this hotel and never want it to get too popular. That said, it
deserves a little mention. If you don’t know where you’re going, you might miss
the nondescript entrance under the triple arches. I’m not sure there’s even a
sign outside. Designed by Andree Putman, Morgans is a boutique hotel with a
modern yet European-style flair. The small lobby is instantly welcoming as is the
pleasant staff. The room’s color scheme is contemporary black
and white. The rooms are small unless you happen to get upgraded to one with a
sitting room. There’s not much space in the bathrooms and the HVAC is on the loud
side, but each room has an inviting, comfy, cushioned window bench—perfect for
stretching out your legs. There’s a small health club, free Wi-Fi, and a breakfast
buffet in a library-like atmosphere. It’s conveniently located just a block away from The Morgan Library Museum (http://www.themorgan.org/), which always has interesting exhibits and is itself a little oasis of art.

Impressions of Chatou

Blogathon June 13

In the late 1800s, when the Impressionists painted in Paris and wanted to escape the summer heat, they cruised to rural Chatou (http://www.chatou.fr), then about an hour and a half outside the city by barge. Today, a twenty-minute train ride on the RER from Paris, Chatou offers tranquility amid an industrial rush of cars and motorbikes and grey buildings. Read more ›

Park City, Utah

Comfortable and Cozy, Old Town Guesthouse is the Best Bed & Breakfast in Park City! Owner Deb Lovci is awesome and makes you feel at home any time of the year. www.oldtownguesthouse.com

Dinner at Vinto with Josh. Always consistently good Italian and reasonable. http://www.vinto.com/

London to Go

London to Go

Regents Park in London in full bloom on recent sunny Sunday afternoon. Roses were overflowing with color. Geese accepted handouts though the signs cautioned, “don’t overfeed.” Swans glided through green muck. Surprised they didn’t get stuck. Poor swans. Though they seemed intent upon slurping the nasty stuff, I say clean up the green slime. Kids romped on the grounds and paddle-boaters gently churned the waters. A Jewish Music Festival was in full swing while Jews for Jesus passed out pamphlets at the periphery. A wondrous day to be out.

Borough Market London

Seemed all of London was wandering the market stalls here Saturday. Giant chocolate chip cookies, buckets of tempting olives, and colorful produce along with and homemade ice cream and other delights. The chocolate milk shake was worth the trip. #London http://boroughmarket.org.uk/